Volume 33, Issue 2 p. 85-97
Article

Effects of a nutrient mixture on infectious properties of the highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza virus A/H5N1

Petr G. Deryabin

Petr G. Deryabin

Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, D.I. Ivanovsky Research Institute on Virology, USA

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Dmitry K. Lvov

Dmitry K. Lvov

Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, D.I. Ivanovsky Research Institute on Virology, USA

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Andrey G. Botikov

Andrey G. Botikov

Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, D.I. Ivanovsky Research Institute on Virology, USA

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Vadim Ivanov

Vadim Ivanov

Dr. Rath Research Institute, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

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Tatiana Kalinovsky

Tatiana Kalinovsky

Dr. Rath Research Institute, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

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Matthias Rath

Matthias Rath

Dr. Rath Research Institute, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

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Aleksandra Niedzwiecki

Corresponding Author

Aleksandra Niedzwiecki

Dr. Rath Research Institute, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA

Address for correspondence: Aleksandra Niedzwiecki, 1260 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95050, USA. Tel.: +1 408 807 5564; Fax: +1 408 567 5030Search for more papers by this author
First published: 19 August 2009
Citations: 9

Abstract

Numerous outbreaks of avian influenza virus infection (A/H5N1) have occurred recently, infecting domestic birds, chicken and ducks. The possibility of the emergence of a new strain of influenza virus capable of causing a pandemic in humans is high and no vaccine effective against such a strain currently exists. A unique nutrient mixture (NM), containing lysine, proline, ascorbic acid, green tea extract, N-acetyl cysteine, selenium among other micro nutrients, has been shown to exert a wide range of biochemical and pharmacological effects, including an inhibitory effect on replication of influenza virus and HIV. This prompted us to investigate the potential anti-viral activity of a nutrient mixture (NM) and its components on avian influenza virus A/H5N1at viral dosages of 1.0, 0.1 and 0.01 TCID50. Antiviral activity was studied in cultured cell lines PK, BHK-21, and Vero-E6. Virus lysing activity was determined by co-incubation of virus A/H5N1 with NM for 0–60 min, followed residual virulence titration in cultured SPEV or BHK-21 cells. NM demonstrated high antiviral activity evident even at prolonged periods after infection. NM antiviral properties were comparable to those of conventional drugs (amantadine and oseltamivir); however, NM had the advantage of affecting viral replication at the late stages of the infection process.